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American Television, News  
 
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Roberts came out publicly in 2006, after joining the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association in 2005. When he appeared as a member of a panel entitled "Off Camera: The Challenge of LGBT TV Anchors" at the association's September 2006 meeting in Miami, his homosexuality became public knowledge. In 2007, he revealed that he had been molested by a Roman Catholic priest when he was in high school.

Roberts is regarded as a major talent in American television news. Since coming out, he has emerged as a visible symbol of new opportunities for openly gay people in society generally, as well as in journalism in particular.

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Although Roberts does not hesitate to allude to his homosexuality in his news broadcasts when it is relevant, he remains thoroughly professional when reporting on glbtq issues. Refreshingly, however, his professionalism does not preclude a certain level of activism, especially through his participation in the National Lesbian & Gay Journalism Association and his contribution of a heartfelt video to the "It Gets Better" campaign.

On September 8, 2008, Rachel Maddow became the first out lesbian to host a prime-time television news program when The Rachel Maddow Show premiered in the 9:00 p.m. weekday slot on MSNBC.

Maddow became a rising star of political commentary during the protracted 2008 presidential campaign. Widely noted for her keen intelligence, self-deprecating wit, and ever-present kindness and good cheer amid the often belligerent world of cable television, Maddow has distinguished herself as an important voice in American political commentary.

Her willingness to confront anti-gay activists, including those responsible for promoting the Ugandan "kill the gays" legislation, which would make homosexuality a crime punishable by death, has made Maddow a champion of the left generally, but especially of glbtq political wonks.

The most influential openly gay television journalist is Anderson Cooper, whose homosexuality was an open secret for years, but was only confirmed in 2012, when he came out in an e-mail to his friend Andrew Sullivan.

Cooper is anchor of the CNN news show Anderson Cooper 360 and also hosts a syndicated daytime talk show, Anderson. He is also a correspondent for the CBS news program, 60 Minutes. He has won several Emmy Awards for his reporting and was the recipient of the coveted Peabody Award for his coverage of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

After his graduation from Yale in 1989, Cooper got his journalistic start as a fact checker for the small news agency Channel One, which produces a youth-oriented news program that is broadcast to many junior high and high schools in the United States, and then graduated to reporting from exotic locales, often in war-torn areas such as Burma, Vietnam, Somalia, Bosnia, and Rwanda.

In 1995, Cooper became a correspondent for ABC News, eventually rising to the position of co-anchor on its overnight World News Now program on September 21, 1999. He also contributed segments to ABC's 20/20.

Cooper moved to CNN in 2001 to co-anchor with Paula Zahn on American Morning. In 2002 he became CNN's weekend prime-time anchor and on September 8, 2003, he was made anchor of Anderson Cooper 360°.

Cooper gained particular prominence for his reporting from New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. His hard-hitting questioning of politicians and officials in the aftermath of the disaster made him a superstar journalist.

In his reporting for CNN, Cooper often tackles gay issues, and has evinced particular interest in the bullying of young people. He won a GLAAD Award in the category of "Outstanding TV Journalism" in 2001 for a 20/20 segment he did on high school athlete Corey Johnson.

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