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Orser, Brian (b. 1961)  
 
page: 1  2  

Justice Lang's pronouncement seems overly sweeping in its dismissal of the potential consequences of persistent , but fortunately her decision did not seriously hurt Orser. The case was settled out of court, and his career did not suffer.

Orser went on performing in ice shows and also took part in the 2000 Goodwill Games, winning yet another silver medal after landing a triple axel in the long program.

Sponsor Message.

Nearing the end of his competitive skating career, Orser stepped behind the boards of the ice rink. In 2005 he and Wilson were appointed skating directors of the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club. The following year Orser became the coach of South Korean skater Yu-Na Kim and led her to a bronze-medal finish at the succeeding Worlds.

Although involuntarily outed and criticized by some in the Canadian glbtq community for not coming out sooner, Orser has become an advocate for equal rights. Being outed was difficult and fearsome for Orser, but he has since achieved a certain peace. "The world's more comfortable with it now," he stated in a 2007 interview. "I'm not a hypocrite, and I'm glad to talk about [my sexuality]."

Orser has been in a committed relationship with designer Jason Forbes since the late 1990s.

Orser has lent his support to programs for AIDS-related charities, notably the annual Toronto 5K Pride and Remembrance Run, for which he has organized teams of Canadian skaters. They call themselves "Silver's Bullets" in ironic recognition of Orser's memorable second-place finishes in major events. Orser's team raised over forty thousand dollars in 2007, when they ran in memory of McCall, and in 2008 they were the top team fund-raisers in an effort dedicated to Pokar.

In 2007 Orser embarked on a farewell tour as a skater in ice shows across Canada. Typical of his reception was the scene described by Heather Sawers of the Halifax Daily News. Orser first performed to Neil Diamond's "Story of My Life" and then "the evening ended on a solemn note, as Orser skated an emotional good-bye program to . . . Diamond's 'I Believe in Happy Endings.' The crowd started his standing ovation during the middle of the skate, while clips of his career highlights flashed on TV monitors. By his final spin, the house lights were raised so that Orser could see the thousands of fans on their feet, applauding his career and wishing him well."

Linda Rapp

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    Bibliography
   

Bondy, Filip. "AIDS Deaths Tear at Figure-Skating World." New York Times (November 17, 1992): A1.

Milton, Steve. "Brian Orser Comes Full Circle; A Man Who Changed Skating in Canada Says Goodbye to Fans on His Final Tour." The Hamilton Spectator (April 4, 2007): Sports, 3.

"Palimony Suit vs. Skater Orser." PlanetOut (November 19, 1998): http://www.planetout.com/news/article-print?1998/11/19/4.

Sawers, Heather. "Halifax Bids Farewell to Mr. Triple Axel." Halifax Daily News (March 30, 2007): 24.

www.canadianexcellence.com.

 

    Citation Information
         
    Author: Rapp, Linda  
    Entry Title: Orser, Brian  
    General Editor: Claude J. Summers  
    Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual,
Transgender, and Queer Culture
 
    Publication Date: 2008  
    Date Last Updated December 18, 2013  
    Web Address www.glbtq.com/arts/orser_b.html  
    Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL   60607
 
    Today's Date  
    Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.  
    Entry Copyright © 2008 glbtq, Inc.  
 

 

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