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Popular Topics in Social Sciences
Africa: Sub-Saharan, Pre-Independence
With reports from hundreds of sub-Saharan African locales of male-male sexual relations and from about fifty of female-female sexual relations, it is clear that same-sex sexual relations existed in traditional African societies, though varying in forms and in the degree of public acceptance
 
Stonewall Riots Stonewall Riots
The confrontations between police and demonstrators at the Stonewall Inn in New York City the weekend of June 27-29, 1969 mark the beginning of the modern glbtq movement for equal rights.
 
Native Americans
A social role for individuals who crossed or mixed male and female characteristics was one of the most widely distributed institutions of native North America.
 
The Sexual Revolution, 1960-1980 The Sexual Revolution, 1960-1980
The sexual revolution of post-World War II America changed sexual and gender roles profoundly.
 
Mixed-Orientation Marriages
Mixed-orientation marriages--those in which one partner is straight and the other is gay or lesbian--often end in divorce, but such an ending is not inevitable.
 
Leather Culture
"Leather" is a blanket term for a large array of sexual preferences, identities, relationship structures, and social organizations loosely tied together by the thread of what is conventionally understood as sadomasochistic sex.
 
Transgender Activism
Since the late nineteenth century, transgendered people have advocated legal and social reforms that would ameliorate the kinds of oppression and discrimination they suffer.
 
Gay Liberation Front
Formed soon after the Stonewall Riots of 1969, the short-lived but influential Gay Liberation Front brought a new militancy to the movement that became known as gay liberation.
 
Congratulations
 
Congratulations Coloradans!
Posted by: Claude J. Summers on 05/01/13
Last updated on: 05/01/13
 
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Courtney and Sonia discuss their union on Fox 31 News.

On May 1, 2013, Colorado's hard-won civil unions for same-sex couples went into effect. On the evening of April 30, hundreds of couples lined up at court houses and city halls to apply for the licenses. City officials in Denver and elsewhere volunteered to expedite the unions at the earliest possible moment. The achievement of civil unions is the culmination of years of struggle by Colorado's glbtq community.

As Joey Bunch of the Denver Post reports, "Hundreds of Colorado gay and lesbian couples put an official government seal on their relationships in the early hours of Wednesday morning, after the state's civil-unions law took effect."

"Shortly after midnight, whoops and cheers rang off the glassy interior of Denver's Wellington E. Webb Building and then again and again when each new set of 10 numbers flashed on a television monitor near the Clerk and Record's office, summoning the next in line to come apply for a license. With paperwork in hand, the couples returned to the atrium to exchange vows."

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock performed many of the first ceremonies, along with U.S. Representative Diana DeGette, municipal judges, and religious officiants.

On March 12, 2013, the Colorado House of Representatives approved a bill that authorizes civil unions for same-sex couples. The bill, which provides all the rights and responsibilities of marriage, had previously passed the Senate and was promptly signed into law by Governor John Hickenlooper.

The House approved the bill by a margin of 39 to 26, with two Republicans joining 37 Democrats in favor of the legislation. The bill passed the Senate last month on a 21-14 vote, with one Republican joining 20 Democrats in favor of the bill.

In 2012, Colorado Republicans in the state's House of Representatives filibustered a civil unions bill, then in a special legislative session called by Governor Hickenlooper, killed it on procedural grounds despite the fact that there were sufficient votes to pass it. The unethical tactics caused great frustration in the state's glbtq community. However, rather than simply accepting the defeat, activists made civil unions a major issue in the 2012 legislative campaign, and on November 6, 2012, Democrats captured control of both houses of the legislature.

Even more delicious, openly gay Democrat Mark Ferrandino, who was a chief sponsor of the civil unions measure in 2012, was selected as Speaker of the House, replacing Republican Frank McNulty who killed the bill. Ferrandino and his partner were among the couples who applied for a civil union license early on May 1, 2013.

The videos below report on the hundreds of gay men and lesbians who gathered in Denver to celebrate the arrival of civil unions.

In this video from the Denver Post, a number of couples explain what the opportunity to have their relationships recognized means to them.

 
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