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Popular Topics in Literature
García Lorca, Federico García Lorca, Federico
The works of García Lorca, internationally recognized as Spain's most prominent lyric poet and dramatist of the twentieth century, are filled with thinly veiled homosexual motifs and themes.
 
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Langston Hughes, whose literary legacy is enormous and varied, was closeted, but homosexuality was an important influence on his literary imagination, and many of his poems may be read as gay texts.
 
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James Baldwin, a pioneering figure in twentieth-century literature, wrote sustained and articulate challenges to American racism and mandatory heterosexuality.
 
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Congratulations
 
Congratulations Coloradans!
Posted by: Claude J. Summers on 05/01/13
Last updated on: 05/01/13
 
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Courtney and Sonia discuss their union on Fox 31 News.

On May 1, 2013, Colorado's hard-won civil unions for same-sex couples went into effect. On the evening of April 30, hundreds of couples lined up at court houses and city halls to apply for the licenses. City officials in Denver and elsewhere volunteered to expedite the unions at the earliest possible moment. The achievement of civil unions is the culmination of years of struggle by Colorado's glbtq community.

As Joey Bunch of the Denver Post reports, "Hundreds of Colorado gay and lesbian couples put an official government seal on their relationships in the early hours of Wednesday morning, after the state's civil-unions law took effect."

"Shortly after midnight, whoops and cheers rang off the glassy interior of Denver's Wellington E. Webb Building and then again and again when each new set of 10 numbers flashed on a television monitor near the Clerk and Record's office, summoning the next in line to come apply for a license. With paperwork in hand, the couples returned to the atrium to exchange vows."

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock performed many of the first ceremonies, along with U.S. Representative Diana DeGette, municipal judges, and religious officiants.

On March 12, 2013, the Colorado House of Representatives approved a bill that authorizes civil unions for same-sex couples. The bill, which provides all the rights and responsibilities of marriage, had previously passed the Senate and was promptly signed into law by Governor John Hickenlooper.

The House approved the bill by a margin of 39 to 26, with two Republicans joining 37 Democrats in favor of the legislation. The bill passed the Senate last month on a 21-14 vote, with one Republican joining 20 Democrats in favor of the bill.

In 2012, Colorado Republicans in the state's House of Representatives filibustered a civil unions bill, then in a special legislative session called by Governor Hickenlooper, killed it on procedural grounds despite the fact that there were sufficient votes to pass it. The unethical tactics caused great frustration in the state's glbtq community. However, rather than simply accepting the defeat, activists made civil unions a major issue in the 2012 legislative campaign, and on November 6, 2012, Democrats captured control of both houses of the legislature.

Even more delicious, openly gay Democrat Mark Ferrandino, who was a chief sponsor of the civil unions measure in 2012, was selected as Speaker of the House, replacing Republican Frank McNulty who killed the bill. Ferrandino and his partner were among the couples who applied for a civil union license early on May 1, 2013.

The videos below report on the hundreds of gay men and lesbians who gathered in Denver to celebrate the arrival of civil unions.

In this video from the Denver Post, a number of couples explain what the opportunity to have their relationships recognized means to them.

 
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