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Popular Topics in Social Sciences
Africa: Sub-Saharan, Pre-Independence
With reports from hundreds of sub-Saharan African locales of male-male sexual relations and from about fifty of female-female sexual relations, it is clear that same-sex sexual relations existed in traditional African societies, though varying in forms and in the degree of public acceptance
 
Stonewall Riots Stonewall Riots
The confrontations between police and demonstrators at the Stonewall Inn in New York City the weekend of June 27-29, 1969 mark the beginning of the modern glbtq movement for equal rights.
 
Native Americans
A social role for individuals who crossed or mixed male and female characteristics was one of the most widely distributed institutions of native North America.
 
The Sexual Revolution, 1960-1980 The Sexual Revolution, 1960-1980
The sexual revolution of post-World War II America changed sexual and gender roles profoundly.
 
Mixed-Orientation Marriages
Mixed-orientation marriages--those in which one partner is straight and the other is gay or lesbian--often end in divorce, but such an ending is not inevitable.
 
Leather Culture
"Leather" is a blanket term for a large array of sexual preferences, identities, relationship structures, and social organizations loosely tied together by the thread of what is conventionally understood as sadomasochistic sex.
 
Transgender Activism
Since the late nineteenth century, transgendered people have advocated legal and social reforms that would ameliorate the kinds of oppression and discrimination they suffer.
 
Gay Liberation Front
Formed soon after the Stonewall Riots of 1969, the short-lived but influential Gay Liberation Front brought a new militancy to the movement that became known as gay liberation.
 
Congratulations
 
Congratulations Olympic Medalists Seimone Augustus and Lisa Raymond
Posted by: Claude J. Summers on 08/13/12
Last updated on: 08/13/12
 
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Seimone Augustus.

We have previously congratulated eight openly gay or lesbian Olympic medalists, here and here. We now congratulate two more medalists: Lisa Raymond, who won a bronze medal in mixed doubles tennis; and Seimone Augustus, who won a gold medal as a member of the dominant U.S. Women's basketball team.

Seimone Augustus was an outstanding college basketball player for LSU and was a no. 1 WNBA draft pick. She plays for the Minnesota Lynx in the WNBA, as well as for Moscow in the WBC. After overcoming a number of health problems, she led the Lynx to the 2011 WNBA championship and earned Most Valuable Player honors in the process. She helped make the American National team one of the most powerful in the history of women's basketball Olympic competition.

In May, she told Michelle Garcia of The Advocate that she and her girlfriend of five years, LaTaya Varner, are planning to marry this summer.

Lisa Raymond has achieved notable success as a doubles player. She has won 73 doubles titles in all, including 11 Grand Slam titles: 6 in women's doubles and 5 in mixed doubles. With partner Mike Bryan, with whom she also won the Wimbledon mixed doubles championship in 2012, she won the bronze medal in mixed doubles at the London 2012 Olympics.

As Cyd Zeigler observed on SBNation, "If Team Gay was a country, it would have finished 31st overall with seven medals, tied with Mexico, Ethiopia and Georgia. They would have beaten the medal count of such countries as Jamaica, Ireland, Argentina and India. They would have finished 21st overall for most golds (four), tied with Iran, Jamaica, Czech Republic and Korea."

There were, of course, many more glbtq Olympians than the 23 who were openly gay or lesbian, and many of the ones who are not publicly out may also have medaled. Still, the fact that ten of the 23 openly gay or lesbian Olympians medaled is amazing. It speaks admirably not only of their high level of accomplishment in their diverse sports, but also of their self-confidence and honesty.

The WNBA video below profiles Siemone Augustus.

The video below offers highlights from Lisa Raymond and Mike Bryan's mixed doubles victory at Wimbledon.

 
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