home
arts
literature
social sciences
special features
discussion
about glbtq
   search

 
   Encyclopedia
   Discussion
 
 
 
 
Advertising Opportunities
Press Kit
Research Guide
Terms of Service
Privacy Policy
Copyright
 
site guide
search tips
research guide
editors & contributors
contact us
send feedback
write the editor
 
 
 
 
subscribe
Subscribe to our free e-mail newsletter to receive a spotlight on glbtq culture every month.
e-mail address:
 
 
 
  unsubscribe
 
 
Popular Topics in The Arts
Drag Shows: Drag Queens and Female Impersonators Drag Shows: Drag Queens and Female Impersonators
Female impersonation need say nothing about sexual identity, but it has for a long time been almost an institutionalized aspect of gay male culture.
 
Photography: Gay Male, Pre-Stonewall Photography: Gay Male, Pre-Stonewall
Although sparse in images documenting the gay community, pre-Stonewall gay male photography blurs the boundaries between art, erotica, and social history.
 
Erotic and Pornographic Art: Gay Male Erotic and Pornographic Art: Gay Male
Given the historic stigma around making, circulating, and possessing overtly homoerotic images, the visual arts have been especially important for providing a socially sanctioned arena for depicting the naked male body and suggesting homoerotic desire.
 
New Queer Cinema
Independent films that aggressively assert homosexual identity and queer culture, the New Queer Cinema can be seen as the culmination of several developments in American cinema.
 
White, Minor
Renowned photographer, teacher, critic, editor, and curator, Minor White created some of the most interesting photographs of male nudes of the second half of the twentieth century, but did not exhibit them for fear of scandal.
 
Halston (Roy Halston Frowick)
The first international fashion superstar, Halston dressed and befriended some of America's most glamorous women.
 
Surrealism Surrealism
An artistic movement that grew out of Dadaism and flourished in Europe shortly after World War I, Surrealism embraced the idea that art was an expression of the subconscious.
 
Winfield, Paul
Film, stage, and television actor Paul Winfield was openly gay in his private life, but maintained public silence about his homosexuality.
 
Congratulations
 
Congratulations to Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau
Posted by: Claude J. Summers on 12/05/12
Last updated on: 12/05/12
 
Bookmark and Share


Janeé Harteau is sworn in as Minneapolis's Chief of Police.

Congratulations to Janeé Harteau, who was sworn in on December 4, 2012 as Minneapolis's 52nd Chief of Police. She took her oath of office in the rotunda of Minneapolis City Hall before a crowd of 300 people. Her life partner Sgt. Holly Keegel and their 13-year-old daughter Lauren stood by her side.

On November 30, 2012, Harteau, a 25-year veteran of the force, was confirmed unanimously by the Minneapolis City Council. She becomes the first woman and first openly gay officer to serve as police chief.

She was appointed by Mayor R.T. Rybak, who told the City Council, "I love the fact that we will have a chief who has worked her way up. She's a smart cop, a savvy administrator and a natural leader," he said.

Harteau and Keegel shared a squad car as patrol officers together in their earlier years on the force, wrote two small books on safety issues, and were sometimes referred to as "Cagney & Lacey," after the characters from a 1980s television police series, according to Randy Furst in a profile in the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

Furst reports that Harteau "gets a strong endorsement from grizzled department veterans and from police union president, John Delmonico."

But Harteau did not always receive the support of her colleagues. In 1996, she and Keegel filed a sexual harassment and discrimination complaint with the state Human Rights Department. Harteau said officers were interrupting police radio transmissions she and Keegel were making so they could not be heard."

Harteau explained to Furst why she filed the complaint: "People don't have to like me and they don't have to agree with me, but when people interfere with the ability for me to do my job, that's where I drew the line. So it became a matter of public safety."

As for the precedent of having a female, openly gay police chief, Harteau downplayed its significance for her personally.

"For others it might be," she said. "And if I can be a role model . . . I want people to see that you can achieve things despite some obstacles in your way. I stand on my merits on how I got here. I've been given tremendous opportunity."

At the swearing-in ceremony, Harteau said, "I will always stand up and do what is right, even if I stand alone." She added, "There are incredibly high expections for me and there should be."

In the video below, Harteau takes the oath of office.

 
browse:   arts   literature   social-sciences   discussion boards
 
learn more about glbtq       contact us       advertise on glbtq.com
 
Bookmark and Share

glbtq™ and its logo are trademarks of glbtq, Inc.
This site and its contents Copyright © 2002-2014, glbtq, Inc.

Your use of this site indicates that you accept its Terms of Service.