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 Topic: 18 (was 15) Queer Women Who Left Their Mark on the World

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Ryan  



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 33
Interests: Queer History and Biography
Physical Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Posted: 2 Apr 2003, 8:22 am    Post subject: 18 (was 15) Queer Women Who Left Their Mark on the World Reply with quote

In addition to the Rainbow Lives website, since February 2003 I have been the writer of the monthly Rainbow Lives gay history and biography column for Swerve: Winnipeg's Monthly Queer Newsmagazine. (For those of you who don't already know, Winnipeg is the capital and largest city (approx. 700,000 people) in the Canadian province of Manitoba.)

Here is the article I submitted for the April 2003 isue, which had the theme "Do the women in our community get the representation they deserve?" Swerve is online at http://www.swervemedia.org; you can see my previous columns in the Feb. 2003 and March 2003 issues. The April 2003 issue should be up by April 5, 2003.

Anyway, I can't think of a better place to post this on the Internet, and perhaps get some feedback and/or spark disagreements, than here on glbtq.com (I plan to put in a plug for this site in my next column). Feel free to use this as a conversation starter: do you agree with my choices? Who would *YOU* include in your list of queer women who left their mark on the world? And why?

Rainbow Lives: Fifteen Queer Women Who Left Their Mark on the World

Jane Addams (1860-1935), American social worker, social reformer, writer, activist, and Nobel Peace Prize winner (1931), whose work with low-income people set a new standard for charitable work and helped create the concept of social welfare; she was the founder of Hull House, a successful Chicago immigrant resettlement centre which established one of the first kindergarten programs in the country; she was also a founder of the American Civil Liberties Union and played a major role in founding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), American teacher, anti-slavery and temperance activist, and women's rights activist, who served as president of the influential National Women's Suffrage Association from 1892 to 1900; in 1920, largely as a result of her and her colleages' hard work, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, more popularly known as the 'Anthony Amendment', was ratified, which guaranteed American women the right to vote. During her life she formed her closest emotional and affectional bond with another women's rights activist, Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Elizabeth Arden (Florence Nightingale Graham; 1884-1966), Canadian-born American entrepreneur, cosmetics industry pioneer, and horse-breeder; she opened a salon on Fifth Avenue, New York City, in 1910, and turned it into a chain of more than 100 salons across America and Europe. "She made a place for herself near the top of two male-governed domains—business and horse-racing—and while doing so, she guided other women, from Fortune 500 matrons to shop girls, toward self-empowerment." (Barrie, C. "Elizabeth Arden", Gay and Lesbian Biography (St. James Press, 1997)

Dr. Sara Josephine Baker (1873-1945), American physician, healthcare reformer, and public health administrator (her medical detective work led to the capture of the original "Typhoid Mary"); she was the president of several child health professional societies, and organized the first child hygiene department in New York City, achieving unprecedented breakthroughs in preventive medicine and child hygiene (New York City had the lowest infant death rate of any American or European city during the 1910s); after her retirement in 1923 she continued her activism as a consultant to national and international organizations for many years.

James Miranda Barry (c. 1795-1865), British; the first woman doctor in the Western world, she graduated from Edinburgh Medical School in 1814 disguised as a man, and then served in the British Military disguised as a male surgeon for over forty-five years, working throughout the British colonies (including Canada, thus becoming the first female doctor to practice in Canada). "Regarded as a dandy and flirtatious, she was known for sexual peccadilloes involving fellow officer's wives and the officers themselves. She fought a duel over one woman in 1819. Barry retired as Inspector General of Hospitals, one of the most senior medical positions in the army. The sensational discovery of her female gender was only made after her death." (Gazetteer for Scotland, online at http://www.geo.ed.ac.uk/scotgaz/gaztitle.html; Barry's entry is at http://www.geo.ed.ac.uk/scotgaz/people/famousfirst630.html)

Rachel Carson (1907-1964), biologist, naturalist and author; her 1962 book Silent Spring alerted the American public to the hazards of pesticides; she can rightly be considered the founder of the modern-day environmental movement.

Michelle Douglas (1963- ), Canadian activist, speaker, and president of the Foundation for Equal Families, a community organization that intervenes in legal challenges dealing with same-sex relationships and gay rights; she is a former military officer who was fired by the Canadian Armed Forces in 1989 for being a lesbian, and her successful court challenge against her dismissal led to the lifting of the ban against gays and lesbians in the Canadian military.

Dr. Ethel Collins Dunham (1883-1969), American pediatrician, neonatologist, and health educator who established standards for the care of newborns, both full-term and premature; director of child development of the U.S. Children's Bureau; in 1957 she was the first woman awarded the John Howland Medal (the American Pediatric Society's highest honour); she exerted wide influence through popular writing and lecturing on the practical applications of new knowledge and standards in infant care.

Kathleen Scott Ginn, American engineering executive; Vice President & Business Line Executive, Pervasive Computing at IBM Microelectronics; she has contributed significant technical accomplishments to IBM's Microelectronics Division, often being the first woman at her level in any given position; co-chair of the IBM Gay and Lesbian Task Force. She was also treasurer of action committees for the Vermont Freedom to Marry Action Committee, and was responsible for fundraising, education, lobbying and grass roots campaigning in support of legislators and the ultimately successful civil-union law in Vermont. Ginn was named one of the 2001 gfn.com 25, a listing by the Gay Financial Network of the 25 most influential out gay and lesbian executives in corporate America.

Dr. Susan M. Love (1948-), American breast cancer surgeon and researcher, social activist, and writer, Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book and Dr. Susan Love's Hormone Book. She helped start the National Breast Coalition lobbying group. Love and her partner of 20 years, Dr. Helen Cooksey, won a landmark Massachusetts Supreme Court case in 1993, when Cooksey was allowed to legally adopt Love's daughter Katie, to whom she gave birth in 1988: "Every time you deny who you are, it's a little nick on your soul." (quote source: http://www.ucsf.edu/synapse/archives/2001.11.29/susanlove.html)

Margaret Mead (1901-1978), American anthropologist and psychologist who studied half a dozen tribes; author of Coming of Age in Samoa, and Curator of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History; while President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1977, she presided over the passage of an AAAS policy statement against discrimination towards gay and lesbian scientists. In a society which had become increasingly pessimistic about the human capacity to change, she insisted that that cultural patterns of racism, warfare, and environmental exploitation were learned, and that people could work together to modify their traditions and to construct new institutions, thus giving rise to her most famous quote: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." (source: http://www.mead2001.org/Biography.htm)

Martina Navratilova (1956-), Czech-born American tennis player; before her singles retirement in 1994, she had won a record (for both women and men) 167 singles titles. In 1995, she co-founded the Visa Rainbow Card and became the public spokesperson of the Rainbow Endowment, an organization that directs funds raised through use of the Rainbow Visa to organizations that promote the health and social well being of the LGBT community (over a million dollars has been raised and donated to date).

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), English nurse and healthcare reformer who, in 1854, took 38 women to Turkey to nurse wounded and sick British soldiers in the Crimean War. As an expert and reformer for hospital hygiene, she organized the world’s first school for nurses, and almost all modern-day nursing systems and techniques can be traced back to her pioneering work.

Rev. Dr. Anna Howard Shaw (1847-1919), American physician, minister (in 1880, she was the first woman ordained by the Methodist Church), social justice activist, and women's suffrage leader and speaker; by the time she stepped down as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in 1915, two million women in twelve states could vote. "Though Shaw's correspondence with her life partner, Lucy Anthony, and with other women who were her lovers suggests that she was what our era would describe as a stomping butch, her public persona was very different...She was a forceful, dynamic speaker at a time when virtuous women were supposed to be demure and silent...Shaw was convinced that if she presented herself as being as radical, as angry, and as impatient as she truly was, she could do nothing for the cause. Therefore, as she grew older, she cultivated a 'grandmotherly' persona, which helped make her 'esteemed by her countrymen, males as well as females.'" (quote source: Faderman, L. "Acting 'Woman' and Thinking 'Man": The Ploys of Famous Female Inverts", GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies 5(3) 315-329)

Charlotte Whitton (1895-1975) was a Canadian politician and social worker, the founding executive director of the Canadian Council on Child and Family Welfare, and a life-long activist for child welfare and disadvantaged women. Whitton was mayor of Ottawa (1951-1956 and 1960-1964), becoming the first woman mayor of a large Canadian city. She is credited with the saying: “Whatever women do they must do twice as well as men to be thought of half so good … luckily, it’s not difficult.”

For more details on these many other LGBT people around the world and throughout history, see the Rainbow Lives website at http://rainbowlives.com.

--Ryan.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
* P.S. I have added three other people to these original 15, as proposed by glbtq.com readers (for details, read further along the thread):
1. Ruth Benedict, nominated by Gibeon
2. Eleanor Roosevelt, nominated by werechick
3. Gertrude Stein, nominated by lindo
_________________
Ryan Schultz, Reference Librarian
University of Manitoba Libraries
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


Last edited by Ryan on 2 May 2003, 2:52 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Gibeon  



Joined: 01 Apr 2003
Posts: 22
Interests: HIstory, languages, writing, current events, movies
Physical Location: Memphis

Posted: 13 Apr 2003, 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ryan wrote:
"Who would *YOU* include in your list of queer women who left their mark on the world? And why?"


Ryan, I certainly think that Ruth Benedict should be on your most influential list. After all, she's even on a United States stamp! Here's why.......

Quote:
Ruth went back to school in the fall of 1919 and began to focus more on anthropology. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University in 1922. While there, Ruth became friends with Elsie Clews Parsons and together they became anthropologists. She studied under the famous diffusionist Franz Boas and eventually became his assistant and taught Margaret Mead. Ruth and Margaret became good friends and developed a mutual dependence on one-another.

Ruth concentrated most of her efforts on researching and studying different cultures on which many of her writings were based. She wrote of the differences between the cultures around the world and talked about different patterns related to culture and behavior.

Ruth taught at Columbia University from 1923 - 1948. Her students reacted differently to her deafness, but it didn’t seem to have any effect on her discussions or her abilities. Ruth Benedict was very talented in summarizing and effectively arranging facts which were characteristic of her writings and ultimately her approach to anthropology; this, perhaps, may be the reason many of her reviews were published in professional papers and magazines throughout her career.

Ruth published four books during her career including Patterns of Culture (1934), Zuni Mythology (1935), Race: Science and Politics (1940), and The Chrusanthemum and the Sword (1946). Ruth Benedict was a very important figure in early anthropology and even more-so in cultural anthropology. She was one of the first female anthropologists of her time. Her books serve as reference points of humanistic thought in the 20th century. She helped to shape the discipline of anthropology not only in the United States, but also for the rest of the world. Ruth died in New York City in 1948.

References:
Benedict, Ruth. Patterns of Culture. Houghton, Mifflin Company. Boston. 1934.

Benedict, Ruth. Zuni Mythology. AMS Press. New York. 1935.

Benedict, Ruth. Race: Science and Politics. 1940. Viking Press. New York. 1940.

Benedict, Ruth. The Chrusanthemum and the Sword. Houghton, Mifflin Company. Boston. 1946.

Modell, Judith S. Ruth Benedict: Patterns of Life. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983.


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Ryan  



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 33
Interests: Queer History and Biography
Physical Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Posted: 13 Apr 2003, 10:56 am    Post subject: This is great...Thanks! Reply with quote

Gibeon wrote:
Ryan, I certainly think that Ruth Benedict should be on your most influential list. After all, she's even on a United States stamp!


Thank you Gibeon! I hadn't quite realized what an impact Ruth Benedict had on the field of anthropology (or that she was hearing impaired).

I will add the information (and image) you've posted to the Ruth Benedict entry on the Rainbow Lives list (turns out she was one of the entries in the book The Gay 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Gay Men and Lesbians, Past and Present, by Paul Russell).

Of course, I'll give you appropriate credit on the "Thanks" section at the bottom of the "How Rainbow Lives Got Started..." page. If you'd rather I credit you by your real name rather than your nom de clavier, then send me a private message. Otherwise, I'll just use Gibeon :-)

This kind of information exchange is why I'm so glad glbtq.com set up a discussion section like this. We can all learn things from each other! It sure the hell beats hanging out in the Manitoba chat room on gay.com (sigh) at least there's some intelligent conversation going on here....oh I'm sorry, was that bitter? :-)
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Ryan Schultz, Reference Librarian
University of Manitoba Libraries
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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Gibeon  



Joined: 01 Apr 2003
Posts: 22
Interests: HIstory, languages, writing, current events, movies
Physical Location: Memphis

Posted: 14 Apr 2003, 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for making my day, Ryan! I am very honored that you will add this information to your excellent website which I have enjoyed as much as this one too.

I second your views on this website interactions. What a wonderful haven for us to recover our lost gay history and to learn more about the history we do know.
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werechick  



Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 28


Posted: 20 Apr 2003, 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about Eleanor Roosevelt?
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Ryan  



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 33
Interests: Queer History and Biography
Physical Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Posted: 20 Apr 2003, 11:18 pm    Post subject: Eleanor Roosevelt Reply with quote

werechick wrote:
What about Eleanor Roosevelt?


I was going to include Eleanor Roosevelt, but I had just included her and her lover Lorena Hickok as one of ten pairs of same-sex lovers in the February 2003 issue and I didn't want to repeat an entry from one month to the next.

But you're right; she also deserves to be included.

--Ryan.
_________________
Ryan Schultz, Reference Librarian
University of Manitoba Libraries
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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werechick  



Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 28


Posted: 20 Apr 2003, 11:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Eleanor Roosevelt Reply with quote

Ryan wrote:
werechick wrote:
What about Eleanor Roosevelt?


I was going to include Eleanor Roosevelt, but I had just included her and her lover Lorena Hickok as one of ten pairs of same-sex lovers in the February 2003 issue and I didn't want to repeat an entry from one month to the next.

But you're right; she also deserves to be included.

--Ryan.


Oh, okay then.
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lindo  



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 2
Interests: music, literature, women's studies
Physical Location: north carolina

Posted: 28 Apr 2003, 5:55 pm    Post subject: gertude stein??? Reply with quote

where is gertude stein?????
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Ryan  



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 33
Interests: Queer History and Biography
Physical Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Posted: 29 Apr 2003, 12:05 am    Post subject: Re: gertude stein??? Reply with quote

lindo wrote:
where is gertude stein?????

Well, I guess you'd have to argue the case that her contributions to the world outweighed the ones of the fifteen women I've chosen (and, to be fair, werechick's inclusion of Eleanor Roosevelt). I'm not strong on the arts side (my areas of specialization are computer science and library science), so you tell me... why do you think Gertrude Stein should be included? In other words, what mark(s) did she leave on the world?
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University of Manitoba Libraries
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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lindo  



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
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Interests: music, literature, women's studies
Physical Location: north carolina

Posted: 29 Apr 2003, 9:06 am    Post subject: gertude stein Reply with quote

she wrote "the autobiography of alice b tolkas", written as though she were her lover, alice. She was the mother of modernist literature. She is responsible for the public knowing about matisse, picasso and renoir.
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Ryan  



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 33
Interests: Queer History and Biography
Physical Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Posted: 30 Apr 2003, 8:19 am    Post subject: Re: gertude stein Reply with quote

lindo wrote:
she wrote "the autobiography of alice b tolkas", written as though she were her lover, alice. She was the mother of modernist literature. She is responsible for the public knowing about matisse, picasso and renoir.

Ah yes, I had forgotten about the famous salon she was at the centre of. Yes, I agree, lindo, her influence was considerable, getting all these brilliant minds together to create sparks of genius off each other.

Consider her included....we'll just add Ruth Benedict, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Gertrude Stein, and make it "Eighteen Queer Women Who Made Their Mark on the World". :-)

Now, anybody else have any other people that they feel SHOULD have been on this list?
Or does someone feel strongly that one of these 18 does NOT belong on this list?
_________________
Ryan Schultz, Reference Librarian
University of Manitoba Libraries
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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