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 Topic: Barack Obama

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JayJay  



Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 79
Interests: gay history

Posted: 29 Aug 2008, 6:58 am    Post subject: Barack Obama Reply with quote

Barak Obama's speech last night was one of the most moving political speeches in my memory. Although I have been skeptical of his electability (and, to some extent, still am), there is no doubt that he would be an extraordinary President. How wonderful it would be to have a President one could be proud of, who respected the Constitution, and who actually was committed to serving the people rather than big oil.
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Linda  



Joined: 12 May 2003
Posts: 66
Interests: Pets, politics, sports, gardening, needlework, mystery novels, cooking
Physical Location: Dearborn, MI

Posted: 29 Aug 2008, 3:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Barack Obama Reply with quote

JayJay wrote:
Barak Obama's speech last night was one of the most moving political speeches in my memory. Although I have been skeptical of his electability (and, to some extent, still am), there is no doubt that he would be an extraordinary President. How wonderful it would be to have a President one could be proud of, who respected the Constitution, and who actually was committed to serving the people rather than big oil.


Back in January, in the ill-fated Michigan primary, I voted for Hillary Clinton. Yes, I am one of those much-discussed baby-boomer generation women Hillary supporters. I was truly excited by the possibility that I might be able to vote for a strong and capable woman for president in November, and part of me is still disappointed that this will not happen.

Like Jay, I had some doubts about the electabiility of Barack Obama, and I am still somewhat troubled that the poll numbers are far closer than they "should" be after the two disastrous terms of George W. Bush.

The convention, however, has left me somewhat more hopeful. I was impressed by Hillary Clinton's speech, as well as by Bill Clinton's and Al Gore's, among others, calling for unity in support of another strong and capable candidate, Barack Obama. Delegates at political conventions are always wildly enthusiastic, but there seemed to be a sense of commitment and urgency in Denver that I hope will lead to wide engagement, especially of new and young voters, in the campaign and the election.

The contrast between the two candidates could not be more clear, nor could the need for change. I support Barack Obama and fully expect that virtually all of the other 18 million Hillary supporters will do likewise.
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gennee  



Joined: 15 Sep 2005
Posts: 414
Interests: reading, writing, poetry, transgender issues, gospel, veteran's issues,jazz,education,religion,literature,Native-American and African culture,lighthouses,trails,castles,tractor trailers, playwriting, biograhies, electronics, bass guitar
Physical Location: new york

Posted: 31 Aug 2008, 12:12 pm    Post subject: Numbers were close from the start Reply with quote

Linda, the numbers between the two candidates have always been close usually 5-8 percent which isn't much. Also, you have a new face (Obama) and one who more or less won because there was no other viable candidate. A lot of Republicans are not that warm towards McCain. There are a lot of voters who simply will not vote for an African-American or a woman. It's sad that in 2008 you still have folks who are narrow minded and bigoted in some cases.

Now with the economy the number one issue, I believe the candidate who can best appeal to the common man and woman will be the one who wins the election. Some will vote along party lines but I believe its time people put that aside and look at where the country is at this point. You have a growing class of working people who are falling into the ranks of working poor. I have met organizer from stes such as Ohio, California, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts who say the same thing.

The real work begins now. However, after the elections each of us must work for the things we truly believe in.

Gennee
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