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 Topic: How can someone hate in the name of Christ glbtq people?

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Robert Mc  



Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 49
Interests: Politics, gay issues, human rights, classical and ethnic music and art, alcoholism and drug addiction recovery, health and fitness, spirituality... We need support to fight homophobia by a hardcore of religious and political leaders who managed to con
Physical Location: Metro San Juan, Puerto Rico

Posted: 24 Jun 2004, 10:54 am    Post subject: How can someone hate in the name of Christ glbtq people? Reply with quote

The following commentary by Andy Preschak is not about the execption, but is the rule here in Puerto Rico. What can we do to make these guys learn that Christ loves glbtq people as much as all his creations? Is Puerto Rico worthy for statehood with this kind of mentality by too many religious and political officials in the territory of Puert Rico? Andy's commentary really disturb me because it describes a widespread anti-gay problem in Puerto Rico.
__________________________________________________
Andy Praschak Commentary San Juan Star June 24, 2004



NO WELCOME MAT IN BOQUERON



Lieutenant José Luis Morales of the Puerto Rico Police Department estimated that more than 5,000 people descended on Boquerón last weekend for Sunday's Gay Pride March.



Owners of commercial establishments in town jubilantly estimated that their sales for the weekend were up 100% above normal.



The Boquerón Paradise T-Shirt Shop had a constant stream of traffic, the Sunset Sunrise Bar & Grill ran out of bottles of water by afternoon, and even the Burrito Guy was out of lettuce by evening. Every merchant who had something to sell, not only sold it but could have sold even more.



So let’s do a little simple math. Calculated conservatively, if the 5,000 visitors to Boquerón spent only $200 each over the weekend on lodging, food, beverages, gasoline and souvenirs, the gay and lesbian community infused the Cabo Rojo economy with more than one million dollars.



Most politicians who care about the well being of their hamlet, would be grateful for this injection of financial support to their economy. Especially for a small tourist town, 5,000 tourists who would otherwise not have been in town can mean tangible support to the wallets of its residents.



So its no surprise that many of the gays and lesbians --- doctors, lawyers, artists, teachers, government officials --- who visited Boquerón last weekend were disappointed, to say the least, by the attitude of Cabo Rojo Mayor Santos Padilla Ferrer who was determined to throw obstacles and insults at us while we were beefing up the economy of his little town.



We should have seen it coming though. Just days before the march, the Mayor sent his Vice-Mayor to march with a handful of fundamentalists who publicly asked God to keep the queers from coming to Boquerón. While marching with a dozen other fanatics, this public official tried to keep us away by brazenly chanting, “Boquerón belongs to Christ.”



I never really understood what that meant exactly but gay people learn quickly to be leery of politicians who use the name of Christ as a weapon against us.



Mayor Padilla publicly endorsed the actions of his Vice-Mayor, the religious fanatics and the “Boquerón belongs to Christ” theme while begrudgingly admitting that the Constitution left him no alternative but to let us march.



I wasn't in town for more than an hour before a group of us were escorted by six police cars, sirens blazing, down to the police station for "questioning" about whether we had a permit to be painting a rainbow flag on a town Wall of Public Expression.



"Permit?" we questioned. "...to paint on a Wall of Public Expression?" "You’ve got to be kidding," we said.



Nope. No kidding. The police told us we could make our argument about our rights of freedom of expression to the local Prosecutor on Monday (the day after the march) but there would be no painting rainbow flags on walls designed for public expression without a permit that weekend.



But the most reprehensible and dangerous decision by the Mayor was his order to the Municipal Police not to provide security for the event. Lieutenant Morales of the Puerto Rico Police determined it was “a boycott” of the activity by the Mayor’s Municipal Police. “This boycott by the Municipal Police is troubling to me. I haven’t seen one municipal policeman all weekend. Something’s going on,” the Lieutenant commented publicly to the press.



Nonetheless, the parade itself was a huge success despite Mayor Padilla’s efforts. I received a call the day after the parade from Dr. Ramos, the organizer of the event. She had grown more indignant about the administration's actions. She’s convinced they rose to the level of violation of some very fundamental constitutional rights of freedom of expression, separation of church and state, and a possible conspiracy to deny the civil rights of our community. She's consulting with some leading civil rights attorneys in San Juan to determine whether our constitutional rights were indeed violated and whether she has a legal cause of action against the municipality in federal court.



The sad irony of the situation is that much of the one million dollars which the gay and lesbian community gladly dropped on the good people of Boquerón for a friendly weekend of fun and pride, may end up coming back to us from the municipality. But if it comes back it may well be in the form of legal fees and a monetary civil judgment from the federal court for violation of our constitutional rights.



When will these guys ever learn?



Andy Praschak is a gay activist and founder of the Fundación de Derechos Humanos.
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Sword  



Joined: 11 Jun 2005
Posts: 40
Interests: Writer, Champion of the underdogs, Lay Minister, Registered Massage Therapy, playing pool, dancing, gardening
Physical Location: Galveston,Texas,USA

Posted: 12 Jun 2005, 6:25 pm    Post subject: My heart goes out to you. Reply with quote

I feel for your persecutions. I would like you to check out the subject 'How would you like some Ammunition' And no it is not advocating violence. It is a Scriptural verse that does not beat around the bush about the LGBTQ community. It is the best verse I can give in your fight for justice, you already have God's love.
Take Care,
Angel Eliza (Sword)
_________________
I have published a book that Affirms that God Loves GLBT. Get a free Reconciler Gospel of Thomas.The pot of Gold was the last verse 114.
Verse 114 is on my website.
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Robert Mc  



Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 49
Interests: Politics, gay issues, human rights, classical and ethnic music and art, alcoholism and drug addiction recovery, health and fitness, spirituality... We need support to fight homophobia by a hardcore of religious and political leaders who managed to con
Physical Location: Metro San Juan, Puerto Rico

Posted: 12 Jun 2005, 6:49 pm    Post subject: The last time I posted on glbtq.com was June 24, 2004... Reply with quote

At one point my computer crashed. I changed another server and than switch back to my current server. I lost contact with this forum.

I have been getting published in a couple gay publications. I have a big article coming up in June how entrapment in the Puerto Rico Breeze. I just joined a AAG which is an internet group for gay alocholics in recovery.

I was submitting to the blog on the website for the Stonewall Democrats. At one time, this blog had exciting topics to post comments about. Recently, they are dull or at least dull to me.

Puerto Rico's local radio station WOSO had an internet forum called "Speakout Online." It dwindled down to only two or three people participating. WOSO's management has stopped this internet forum for awhile.
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miji  



Joined: 13 Aug 2005
Posts: 3
Interests: Literature Light rock music

Posted: 20 Sep 2005, 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

well, here in my country situation is not so good also. Reports said that
there were over 30 million homo in China now. But such a large number of
people have not been treated well and equally as the hetero. As a result
many of them did not come out and finally end up in marriage against their
will. Pressure comes from all kinds of ways, esp politics rather than religion.
That is a large difference i guess. Political pressure is rigid while religious
one is sensed by heart. Still both are untolerable sometimes.
Recently there is a course named Study on Homosexuality launched in my
university and that spurred the whole city. On the first day the classroom was
as crowded as a sardine can. Ambiguous air flow above 250 heads and people
all felt awkward. i do not like the atmosphere. Just like... there were criminals among
us and every one was guessing, suspecting, watching...
So u see, things are bad unfavourable here...
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Robert Mc  



Joined: 15 Jan 2004
Posts: 49
Interests: Politics, gay issues, human rights, classical and ethnic music and art, alcoholism and drug addiction recovery, health and fitness, spirituality... We need support to fight homophobia by a hardcore of religious and political leaders who managed to con
Physical Location: Metro San Juan, Puerto Rico

Posted: 20 Sep 2005, 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The San Juan Star reports in its news article, "Some gay unions may become legal here," (Sept. 15, 2005 - page 5) that New Progressive Party Sen. José Emilio González , a member of the permanent legislative committee drafting the new Civil Code [for Puerto Rico], was unaware the revision would recognize some gay marriages. "I will not support anything that goes against what we are," González said.

Actually what does the senator mean when he says "goes against what we are"?

Here are some examples of "what we are" could mean:

Puerto Rico has one of the highest rate of births out of wedlock under the American flag. A high percentage of heterosexual marriages are common law rather than legal or sanctified in a religious matrimonial ceremony.

Puerto Rico is at the top of the charts for domestic violence of family members and abuse of animals.

Puerto Rico has one of the highest murder rates under the American flag. It is only topped by the District of Columbia.

Puerto Rico has a public school system that fails it students worse than any other jurisdiction under the American flag.

Puerto Rico has the reputation for having more than thirty-two high level government officials of the former Rosselló Administration convicted of corruption of millions of dollars of public funds earmarked for the people. More indictments are expected from the federal Super Aqueduct investigations.

Puerto Rico, after nine months into a new Commonwealth administration, still does not have a Commonwealth budget or all executive branch agency officials approved by the Puerto Rico Legislature.

Puerto Rico has a current governor who rips off the public with exorbitant increases in highway tolls and basic services such as electricity and water. All these increases are done secretly and quickly without public hearings by imperial edicts from the governor. He needs to find lots of money quickly to cover billions of dollars overspent and wasted by his party's previous governor Sila Calderón. -- We are still eagerly waiting for the U.S. Congress General Accounting Office report to reveal the shocking truth about the misuse of federal funds on the island.

Puerto Rico has one of the worse infrastructure in terms of highways, schools and other public structures under the American flag. The public wonders what happened to the taxes and tolls collected to maintain existing and to build new infrastructure. Lots of funds are collect, but seem to disappear into thin air. Some highways are torn up and basic work never completed for years.

Puerto Rico has the highest rate of active drug addicts and alcoholics in the nation. Many are homeless, ill and starving. Certain sections, such as tourist areas of San Juan, are like scenes from the movie "Land of the Dead."

Puerto Rico has become a dead-end for its youth that over six thousand Puerto Ricans flee the island every year for the mainland for a better life and never to return. More than the majority of Puerto Ricans still living on the island depend on federal public assistance.

Puerto Rico because of "what we are" has never given the federal government encouragement during the last 200 years to make it possible for Puerto Rico to become a state.

Perhaps, Senator José Emilio González could do his list of "what we are" following the same format as my list. When we are in DENIAL about what we really are, it is a good idea to do a "Truthful and Fearless Moral Inventory" listing in detail exactly "what we are"? There are a lot of wonderful things about Puerto Rico and its people. I have never met people more caring and loving than Puerto Ricans. The Puerto Ricans that I know are not judgmental as some of their political and religious leaders. Does Sen. José Emilio González consider gay people to be against "what we are"? Is he willing to cast the first stone with his sanctimonious moral judging of a group of God's Children because he is too insular (100-mile-by-35-miles -- the size of the Island of Puerto Rico) to understand diversity?

I appreciate hearing from miji who resides in mainland China. It sounds like the average person in China is more interested in learning about gay issues and human rights for all people than the religious zealots and political bigots in Puerto Rico. China is fast becoming the foremost economic power in the world. It sounds like China is a country of the future capaple of changing. -- It is by no means insular. -- In contrast, Puerto Rico remains a colonial territory locked into the mentality of the Spanish Inquistion under Philip II of Spain. Why does China have the promise of the future and P:uerto Rico the stagnation to keep it locked in an anti-gay insular mentality.

Robert McCarroll -- Carolina, Puerto Rico
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