glbtq: an encyclopedia of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender & queer culture
home
arts
literature
social sciences
special features
www.glbtq.com Forum Index
about glbtq
   search
  
 
   Encyclopedia
   Discussion
 
 

   member name
  
   password
  
 
   
   Forgot Your Password?  
   
Not a Member Yet? 
   
JOIN TODAY. IT'S FREE!

 
 

  Advertising Opportunities
  Permissions & Licensing
  Terms of Service
  Privacy Policy
  Copyright
 

Index      FAQ       Member List       Report Abuse        Guidelines    


 Topic: homosocial literature...your favorites

Reply to topic   Post new topic
Author Message
indycur7  



Joined: 14 Jan 2006
Posts: 3


Posted: 14 Jan 2006, 12:19 am    Post subject: homosocial literature...your favorites Reply with quote

So much of what might be considered a queer cannon stems from the work of literary pioneers of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Long before overt homosexuality, indeed in some cases before such a term existed, we find in prose and verse some wonderful examples of men loving men. This love, of course, is not the Wildeian no-named sort but a quieter more subdued scene of what was later to come.

As a student and a reader I was wondering if any of you have any favorites in this genre. Where have you found such homosocial relationships? Any in some surprising texts? I've always loved war novels myself...and where else does the bond of man become stronger than in the face of death?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Paloma  



Joined: 09 Feb 2006
Posts: 35
Interests: I'm studying literature. So of course I'm interested in that. I am also interested in films and music. Well, Culture in general.
Physical Location: Roskilde - Denmark

Posted: 9 Feb 2006, 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I study literature, so of course homosexual and homosocial literature must be interesting for me. At the moment I think Maurice by E. M. Forster is my favorite homosocial book. I know it is probably on the edge of homosexual, but I still think it has a lot of the innocence of homosocial literature.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send email
indycur7  



Joined: 14 Jan 2006
Posts: 3


Posted: 12 Feb 2006, 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paloma wrote:
I study literature, so of course homosexual and homosocial literature must be interesting for me. At the moment I think Maurice by E. M. Forster is my favorite homosocial book. I know it is probably on the edge of homosexual, but I still think it has a lot of the innocence of homosocial literature.


I also quite like E.M. Forster, though I do feel Maurice more overt than many of his other works. I think it interesting and commendable how often Forster even tarried into the homosocial bonds between women in books like Howard's End and A Room with a View.

Have you ever read Timothy Findley’s The Wars? Nothing particularly inventive as far as the structure of the novel there, but this WWI story certainly gives a unique perspective to early twentieth century male sexuality.
[/i]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Paloma  



Joined: 09 Feb 2006
Posts: 35
Interests: I'm studying literature. So of course I'm interested in that. I am also interested in films and music. Well, Culture in general.
Physical Location: Roskilde - Denmark

Posted: 26 Feb 2006, 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't read that book. At the time I don't have time to read a lot of homosocial or homosexual literature, because I spend all my time reading the books I have to read. Unfortunately. I hope I will have time to read something else in the summer holidays. Until then I must be patient.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send email
Carew  



Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 8
Interests: Movies, television, sports, politics, literature, current events

Posted: 15 Aug 2007, 8:20 am    Post subject: A Separate Peace Reply with quote

I read this novel in the late 1960's when I was in high-school before I realized that I was gay, though I did know that I was somehow different. I enjoyed it and it stuck in my mind. I remembered it as a story of a friendship between two prep-school boys that ultimately ended tragically. Years later I re-read it. There's nothing overtly gay about it but it's clearly a story about the love between two boys that could not be expressed because of the time and circumstances, with ultimately tragic consequences. It might be considered dated now but reading it was an early experience in my own eventual coming to terms with being gay.
_________________
Tim Carew
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimdan  



Joined: 19 Sep 2007
Posts: 2
Interests: Music, art, theatre, opera, literature
Physical Location: Australia

Posted: 19 Sep 2007, 8:12 pm    Post subject: Re: A Separate Peace Reply with quote

Carew wrote:
I read this novel in the late 1960's when I was in high-school before I realized that I was gay, though I did know that I was somehow different. I enjoyed it and it stuck in my mind. I remembered it as a story of a friendship between two prep-school boys that ultimately ended tragically. Years later I re-read it. There's nothing overtly gay about it but it's clearly a story about the love between two boys that could not be expressed because of the time and circumstances, with ultimately tragic consequences. It might be considered dated now but reading it was an early experience in my own eventual coming to terms with being gay.


There was a beautiful French novel, [/b][/quote][/i]Les Amities Particulieres, by Roger Peyrefitte, published in 1943, which I think was translated into English as Special Friendships, dealing with the love between two young boys and the involvement of a teacher/priest in their relationship. The plot summary is as follows:

Georges de Sarre, a fourteen-year-old boy is sent to a Catholic boarding school in 1920s France. Getting to know the other boys, he is immediately sexually interested in Lucien Rouvière, of whom he is warned by the unsympathetic Marc de Blajan, who cryptically informs him that some of the students "may seem good, but are in fact not". Georges is dismayed when he learns that Lucien already has a boyfriend, André Ferron. He befriends Lucien, but filled with envy, tries to destroy their relationship, eventually succeeding in getting André expelled in a Machiavellian scheme.

When his advances towards Lucien remain fruitless, Georges starts a "special friendship", i.e. a friendship with homosexual overtones, with a twelve-year-old student, the beautiful Alexandre (Alexander) Motier. The priests who lead the school disapprove of their relationship, even though it does not go beyond a few kisses and love poems. Peyrefitte leaves it to the imagination whether the two eventually would have had sexual intimacy, but at any rate the outcome is tragic for the two boys. For despite their air of condemnation of these special friendships, some of the priests harbour sexual feelings for the boys.

One of them, Father de Trennes, likes to invite boys to join him in his room at night for a few drinks and cigarettes (and supposedly other things). Georges continues his scheming ways (which probably will serve him well in his later life as a diplomat) and gets Father de Trennes expelled by an anonymous letter. However, Father Lauzon, who is secretly also in love with Alexander, learns about their relationship and demands that it be ended immediately.

Lauzon talks Georges into giving back the love letters from Alexander, which at the time the novel is set meant that a relationship was over. Unfortunately, Alexander cannot see that Georges was forced to do this and that his feelings for him are actually unchanged—and commits suicide. When Father Lauzon expresses his condolences to George, he alludes to the true nature of his feelings for Alexander.

The work has been praised for its elegant style, and the discretion with which the subject is treated. One example is the question which Alexander poses to Georges: "Georges, do you know the things one should not know?"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jimdan  



Joined: 19 Sep 2007
Posts: 2
Interests: Music, art, theatre, opera, literature
Physical Location: Australia

Posted: 23 Sep 2007, 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paloma wrote:
I study literature, so of course homosexual and homosocial literature must be interesting for me. At the moment I think Maurice by E. M. Forster is my favorite homosocial book. I know it is probably on the edge of homosexual, but I still think it has a lot of the innocence of homosocial literature.



The Pat Barker World War I trilogy has homosexual themes running through it and some surprisingly vivid descriptions of acts apart from being a wonderful series of three novels for one of which she won the Booker Prize, but deserved it for all three.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic   Post new topic    

Page 1 of 1

 


Discussion Boards by phpBB © 2006 phpBB Group

www.glbtq.com is produced by glbtq, Inc., 1130 West Adams Street, Chicago, IL   60607
glbtq™ and its logo are trademarks of glbtq, Inc.
This site and its contents Copyright © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.
Your use of this site indicates that you accept its Terms of Service.