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social sciences

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Androgyny  
 
page: 1  2  

Expanding the Definition of Androgyny

During the 1990s a mood of gender questioning swept over the glbtq community. No longer content to move from the male/female dichotomy to the gay/lesbian dichotomy, young queers began to search for broader terms in which to define themselves. They began to expand the definition of androgyny to include not only those who blended male and female gender characteristics, but also those whose gender was impossible to determine and those who refused to identify themselves in traditional gender dichotomies.

Many sought purposely to confuse the world's perception of their genders. They created a term "gender fuck" to describe the act of manipulating and confounding the world's perception of their gender.

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Gender fucking might include wearing an evening dress with a full beard, or a t-shirt with the legend "Boy Dyke."

However, while "gender outlaws" may now be more prevalent in urban societies, the social construct of gender is still quite strictly enforced. Those who challenge it do so at great personal risk.

Tina Gianoulis

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A figure of uncertain gender in whom identifying sexual characteristics are stylized or combined, the androgyne is a significant and recurrent subject in art, one that has often held special significance for glbtq people.

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arts >> Boy George (George O'Dowd)

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Now considered one of the most original artists of the last half of the twentieth century, Henry Darger died completely unknown in his native Chicago.


    Bibliography
   

Bornstein, Kate. Gender Outlaw. New York: Routledge, 1994.

Epstein, Julia, and Kristina Straub, eds. Body Guards: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity. New York: Routledge, 1993.

Heilbrun, Carolyn. Toward a Recognition of Androgyny. New York: Norton, 1982.

Lorber, Judith. Paradoxes of Gender. New York: MacMillan, 1994.

 

    Citation Information
         
    Author: Gianoulis, Tina  
    Entry Title: Androgyny  
    General Editor: Claude J. Summers  
    Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual,
Transgender, and Queer Culture
 
    Publication Date: 2004  
    Date Last Updated January 11, 2009  
    Web Address www.glbtq.com/social-sciences/androgyny.html  
    Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL   60607
 
    Today's Date  
    Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.  
    Entry Copyright © 2004, glbtq, inc.  
 

 

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