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social sciences

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Washington, D. C.  
 
page: 1  2  3  

The bill was described by openly gay Council member David Catania as "the culmination of a long journey as we attempt to be true to our motto--'Justice for All.'"

Under the legislation, same-sex couples who live in the District and who have been married in other jurisdictions are granted such legal rights as joint filing of city tax returns and all private health care and pension benefits that are afforded heterosexual couples.

Sponsor Message.

Catania regarded the bill as a precursor to full marriage equality. That goal advanced in December 2009, when the Council passed a bill on December 15 legalizing same-sex marriage, which was signed into law by Mayor Adrian Fenty on December 18.

Like all D.C. legislation, the law was subject to review by Congress, which had the power to invalidate it within 30 working days. Despite the attempts of some Republican Congressmen to invalidate the law, the Democratic-controlled Congress refused to intervene.

Opponents of same-sex marriage also sued in federal court, alleging that the law should be subject to a referendum. Finally, on March 2, 2010, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts announced the Court's refusal to issue a stay of the legislation. Somewhat ominously, he pointed out that the law might be subject to repeal via the District's initiative process, though that question would have to work its way through the appellate process before reaching the Supreme Court.

On March 3, 2010, the District began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.]

Brett Genny Beemyn

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social sciences >> Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG)

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    Bibliography
   

Beemyn, Brett. "A Queer Capital: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Life in Washington, D.C., 1890-1955." Ph.D. diss., University of Iowa, 1997.

_____. "A Queer Capital: Race, Class, Gender, and the Changing Social Landscape of Washington's Gay Communities, 1940-1955." Creating a Place for Ourselves. Brett Beemyn, ed. New York: Routledge, 1997. 183-210.

Gay and Lesbian Activists Alliance of Washington, D. C.: www.glaa.org.

The Rainbow History Project of Washington, D. C.: /www.rainbowhistory.org.

 

    Citation Information
         
    Author: Beemyn, Brett Genny  
    Entry Title: Washington, D. C.  
    General Editor: Claude J. Summers  
    Publication Name: glbtq: An Encyclopedia of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual,
Transgender, and Queer Culture
 
    Publication Date: 2004  
    Date Last Updated March 9, 2010  
    Web Address www.glbtq.com/social-sciences/washington_dc.html  
    Publisher glbtq, Inc.
1130 West Adams
Chicago, IL   60607
 
    Today's Date  
    Encyclopedia Copyright: © 2002-2006, glbtq, Inc.  
    Entry Copyright © 2004, glbtq, inc.  
 

 

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